Posts Tagged health

LEVIT8: The Portable Standing Desk

Levit8 innovative standing desk

As people are becoming more aware of the harmful health effects of sitting too long at work, people are looking for alternative solutions and one popular one is the standing desk. Standing desks however are expensive, costing from $600 to $100 and taking up a lot of space in the office and at home. In response to the lack of options, many independent innovators are attempting to create cheaper, portable, and effective standing desks.

I’ve seen many interesting, solid solutions to the standing desk (from Lift Top’s Sit-Stand, the minimalistic Altostand, and the StandStand), but when it comes to true ease and portability, none of them had really nailed it, until I saw the new design of LEVIT8 on Kickstarter.

The LEVIT8 is stain-proof and slimmer than a Macbook Air, but carries 20x more than its own weight. It’s origami inspired design allows the stand to be folded up into a slim book, making it easy to carry around with you and store. There are no multiple parts or unnecessary assembly at all.

It’s appeal is evident as they had reached their target of $4,000 in only 2 days and have currently surpassed their goal 13x over.

Their fundraiser ends this Friday, so show your support for this truly innovative design!

9 Tips When Approaching Sensitive Research Topics

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Let’s talk about personal hygiene. Or sex? How about death and illness?

Researchers know too well that not all topics are easy to talk about, and there are certain topics of conversation that people will naturally shy away from because they are deemed too personal, stressful, sacred, or deal with a fear of stigmatization.

In our work, we have dealt with a variety of highly personal, sensitive topics from personal care (hygiene, body image, etc.) to health and wellness (illness, psychological disorders, aging, etc.). We know that dealing with these topics takes patience and experience to truly get the most out of your conversations, but still respect and protect the consumer.

Here are our top 9 tips when approaching sensitive research topics.

1. Use online platforms so they can feel a little more anonymous in their sharing
Even if you are doing in-person work, starting out online can act as a perfect warm up, allowing respondents to share more while “hiding behind their screen”.  Start with private online activities and then slowly transition to online group discussion to get respondents more comfortable sharing with others. At antedote, our online platforms allows us to prime our consumers with exercises, from questionnaires or virtual collages, warming them up for the actual face-to-face time, and ultimately allowing for deeper, richer, and more focused conversation.

2. Consider the environment
Traditional conference style tables and chairs can feel rather cold and uncomfortable. Consider starting with a happy hour with appetizers and wine, then moving into a relaxed living room setting to do the group talk.

3. Set up the conversation
The beginning of the conversation is crucial. Spend ample time talking about the flow of the day before getting started and answering any questions. Help set their expectations to put their minds at ease by using phrases like “there are no wrong answers” and “we don’t know what we we’re looking for”.

4. First, talk about something else
Don’t just dive right into the sensitive topic. “How do you feel about the way your skin looks?” is obviously never a good starter. Instead begin by talking about how the behavior plays out in a different, less sensitive category first, then work your way to the intended sensitive topic.

For example, if the topic being studied is evening skin tone, which can become a sensitive discussion due to its associations around aging, personal care and cleanliness, you can begin by first talking about the same behavior in a more comfortable scenario, such as stain/removal in household care. You can facilitate the conversation around removing stains from clothing, sheets, or whitening teeth – then tactfully move into skin. Respondents are more likely to talk freely about a less personal topic first, so it’s a good way to start out.

5. Allow them to educate you
Don’t assume you know everything. Leave all assumptions and pre-conceived notions behind. Ask for them to teach you about what is going on. What do they hope for from products? What is it like to be them? What do they wish people knew? You be the student and let them be the teacher.

6. Have them share with one another
Set up forums or focus groups as a safe place for discussion. If everyone in the group is dealing with the same sensitivity, they may even enjoy exchanging tips or suggestions or empathizing with one another.

7. Use metaphors
Bring in visuals. It’s easier to talk about sensitive issues in the abstract. Allow them to point to visuals or draw pictures to describe how they feel.

8. The power of stories
People tell stories everyday. Encourage them to share stories about the topic they are dealing with as opposed to just “answering the question”. Stories can get deeper and open up new conversations you wouldn’t even think to have had.

9. Be prepared to share yourself
Traditionally moderators are trained to keep themselves out of the conversation, but to encourage sharing on sensitive topics it helps to build rapport and open your personal self to the conversation. Just keep in mind to keep the self-sharing to a minimum so you’re not influencing them, but rather showing that you can relate. Making them feel connected will generate a better conversation.

New Wearables Restore a Lost Connection

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Technology has a track record of disconnecting us from our bodies. From 9-5, we are hunched over and typing away at our computer desks; during lunch, we crane our necks to check messages on our smart phones; and even when we get home to relax, we stare into our iPads to watch Netflix. Unfortunately, the longer we live in the world of our screens, the longer we are absent from and unaware of the needs of our own bodies, reinforcing bad habits for our health and well being.

In the past few years, researchers have been studying the impact of the physical self on mental and emotional states. You’ve probably heard about how body posture can boost confidence, helping you to perform better in an interview or to nail your next presentation. Or you’ve seen this map of emotions on the body, which is just another example of how emotions are connected to biological responses.

But what’s most interesting is that technology is stepping in to enable people to reconnect with their bodies, a separation which you can say it is responsible for in the first place.

Take, for example, the new wearable device Spire. When clipped to your bra strap or belt loop, it detects when you are tense, and sends notifications to your phone to remind you to step away and breathe. It tracks your breathing patterns and data for you over time, and then actually makes recommendations for how to make real-time changes to your habits. “You’ve been sitting for over an hour, perhaps you should stretch your legs”

There are similar apps out there (Lumolift, for example detects bad posture, and reminds you to sit up straight) that are also trying to take a hold of the tech-wellness space and restore the connection between the mind and the body. This combined with power poses is a recipe for physical health and mental success.

While I’m not sure yet which approach I’d personally take for reconnecting with my physical responses to stress from the many options out there, as a researcher I’m most interested in what the reception of these apps says about shifts in our mindset as a culture, and the fresh ground they are tapping into. There’s a return to the natural and to the balanced, and it’s not exactly tech-free. The shift shows just how deeply dependent on technology we are, that we need to use technology to connect with our most basic functions – like breathing and sitting without hunching over.

There’s still a lot to be explored when it comes to mind-body connection and the role of technology, and I’m excited to see what research will uncover next, and how it will be implemented into other consumer-facing devices.

antedote is an award-winning strategic insights and innovation consultancy based in San Francisco, and we have helped many of the world’s leading brands like Pepsico and Unilever to garner deeper insights about their consumers and identify opportunities to grow their brands. 

To learn about antedote’s new platform, Idea Accelerator, that allows you to explore and iterate concepts, packaging designs and communications with consumers globally and in real time, please click below:

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Bubble Gum Broccoli? McDonald’s Food Innovation Fail

bubble gum broccoli innovation fast food fail

As McDonald’s faces pressure to revive their sales as they lose their consumers to healthier fast-casual options like Chipotle, who promotes organic and local sourcing, they are moving on multiple fronts to stay relevant, and ultimately thrive in an increasingly health-conscious world.

Bubble Gum Flavored Broccoli” is one thing that McDonald’s has discovered not to do.

This wacky food mashup was a front-runner in McDonald’s attempt to get kids to eat vegetables, with CEO Don Thompson sharing the breakthrough publicly at a VC event. However, unsurprisingly enough, they soon realized that adding sweet flavoring to a vegetable wouldn’t make it any more appetizing to kids who were absolutely confused by the flavor.

The crunchy cruciferous has always been a hard sell with growing palates, and in the past they’ve been smothered with sauces far and wide to make them easier to eat. Broccoli has been whirled into green juices and hidden away with other natural flavors to make a tasty drink. We can imagine that McDonald’s saw a number of benefits with the reflavoring including cost, exclusivity and an offering that fits in the “healthy” category. Since we don’t know how this concoction was created (through additional flavorings or genetics), they’ve left open the door for blowback from related to GMO concerns, ridicule by healthy food advocates and parents that are trying to get their children to explore new tastes and textures.

McDonald’s needs to better understand its own consumers in order to focus their product development efforts. Throwing oddities like bubble gum broccoli at a wall to see what sticks may not be the most efficient way to launch successful innovations.

What emotional and social factors drive people to and away from McDonald’s? What opportunities are there for McDonald’s to encourage healthier eating from their menu? How can the brand launch innovations that support a healthier image that overshadows their “Super Size Me” scar?

To innovate and survive in an increasingly health-conscious world, fast food and casual dining restaurants need to gain consumer insights that can help to identify the best opportunities to stay one step, or multiple steps ahead of the curve for their brand. Consumer understanding is the key, and McDonald’s needs to take their insight to the next level to avoid public missteps as they work to transition their brand.